Alison Sweeney's Feed Your Better Self Campaign! (Healthy Hollywood)

Access Hollywood
Ali Sweeney -- Access Hollywood
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Ali Sweeney -- Access Hollywood

As host of NBC's "Biggest Loser," Alison reveals to Healthy Hollywood she's inspired to stay fit. After all, she's got two of America's favorite trainers, Jillian Michaels and Bob Harper, to fuel her motivation. "I push myself harder than I would normally because I know I can; having been around trainers as talented as them. In general, it's not that we go hardcore but we don't know what we are capable of, so we play it safe. It's good to stretch your limits and push yourself and make it uncomfortable and even fail."

Season 15 of "The Biggest Loser" premieres on October 8 on NBC. Yet, before the launch, Alison has teamed up with Arnold/Oroweat breads for the Feed Your Better Campaign, which inspires folks to achieve their own health and wellness goals.

People can share their inspirational stories and three of them will be chosen by Alison to receive part of a $100K fund. "The idea is to encourage people to set goals for themselves and to think about what they can do better and what is they're better self," adds Alison.

As part of the initiative, Alison has set personal wellness goals for herself, adding, "I've decided that my better self is to slow down and be OK with a slower pace. Yet, I'm going to get in a good workout, but it's also important to spend 10 minutes stretching, unwinding, or even meditating. That's just as important as the fast paced intense workout."

The busy mother of two is also committed to teaching her family healthy lifestyle habits. "There are two equally important lessons as a mom. One of them is healthy eating habits and healthy workout habits and I have to model it. I have to eat my vegetables, it doesn't work to just say it, you have to do it," advises Alison.

But, also, this Hollywood mom doesn't want her kids to get food hang-ups. "Based on the way I was raised, I want to make sure my kids don't have a complex about eating. The mental part is so important to me. I don't want them to put food on too high of a pedestal and it is based on some sort of reward system. Or, I don't want them to go crazy and feel deprived. I think about how to have a normal relationship with food and not make kids associate their weight with their self-worth."

To share your "better" story, head to www.feedyourbetter.com.

-- Terri MacLeod

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